The ROI of Resource Planning

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If you try searching Google for data on the ROI of resource planning or resource management, you won't find much, if anything. You'll find lots of articles on the ROI of Enterprise Resource Planning tools, such as SAP, etc., and some on the ROI of portfolio management in general, but resource planning in the context of project portfolio management is an underserved area, and especially so when it comes to the value of it.

It's a shame, because resource planning is the single most important thing you can do to improve project throughput, boost productivity, and increase value delivery. If you balance capacity with prioritized demand, good things tend to happen. In fact, organizations that implement resource planning can gain on average approximately 30% of the value of their project portfolio. Do the math. It's usually a lot of money. And that doesn’t even touch on the exponential intangible benefits.

Where does such a lofty estimate come from? It just so happens that I did the research on this and wrote a white paper on the ROI of Resource Planning. And if anything, this estimate is on the low end. 

You can download The ROI of Resource Planning for free HERE. Happy reading!


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

A Systems Approach to Resource Management

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One often overlooked method for improving resource optimization is to employ systems thinking. Sure, resource optimization is mostly about prioritizing and filtering your incoming demand and lining it up with the available capacity. Seems easy enough.

But resource optimization is much more than balancing supply with demand. It’s also about getting the most out of your people, whose productivity can vary based on environmental factors and whether they’re having a good day or bad day, which itself can have many influencers.

The first step is to look at the causing and resulting variables of resource workload going up or down, as well as the causing variable of those factors.

An excellent tool for assessing the variables that impact resource optimization is the causal loop diagram, a common systems thinking tool for assessing cause and effect. Below is a sample causal loop diagram that illustrates the variables that can lead to resource overload. An “S” between variables indicates that one can influence the other in the same direction (up or down). An “O'“ indicates the first variable influences the second in the opposite direction.

Similar to a fishbone diagram, the idea is to take each variable and think about the possible factors that could impact it. Then it’s a matter of launching policies and initiatives to make improvements.

In the example below (looking at the top of the diagram), if the rigor of intake filters and prioritization goes up, resource workload will go down (opposite direction). If demand goes up, resource workload goes up (same direction).

Likewise, going around the circle, if resource frustration goes up, the errors will likely go up, raising the level of distraction, which in turn raises resource workload even further. It’s a viscious circle. You can also see the variables that impact those variables, and you could extrapolate it out even further to see what factors influence those.

All in all, it helps you to develop a holistic action plan that considers all the driving factors and takes appropriate action.

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So, next time you endeavor to improve resource optimization, don’t just look at supply vs. demand. Consider the whole system.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

It's the People, Stupid: Key insights from Brightline and Google

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It's hard to dispute that people are the fuel on which an organization runs. They're what'll carry you from an idea or a goal to a winning product or service. Without a doubt, you can have the best strategy and the most accurate resource plan in the world, but if the people don't perform at their peak or aren't on board with your mission, your organization's main vehicle will stall before it even gets out of the driveway.

This is the crux behind the Brightline Initiative's People Manifesto, a free PDF download worth checking out. As Brightline points out, "People form the link between strategy design and delivery."

Brightline's People Manifesto includes four central principles, each of which refreshingly dares to fly in the face of common thinking and practice. I’ve paraphrased below with my own commentary:

Leadership is Over-Emphasized - While Brightline recognizes the crucial role of transformative leadership, they point out that sometimes it's best to follow someone in the know and support them to your best ability (this is true for leaders and followers alike). Likewise, not everyone's value to the organization will be as a leader, so be sure to value great "doers" as well. Don’t fall into the trap of trying to make everyone a leader.

Collaboration is Key but Isn't Everything - Nobody is saying collaboration isn't critical, but individual efforts and heroism play a significant part as well. I've always endorsed this approach, so I was pleased to see it considered. Sometimes, teamwork is indeed vital for the synergies it brings, and sometimes the Herculean efforts of the few or the one is what saves the day. Nurture your heroes and know when teamwork is needed and when it isn’t.

Culture is Never Built - While culture can't be forced, it CAN and SHOULD be nourished. As Brightline emphasizes, a shared sense of purpose and mutual trust can help create an environment where a positive and productive culture can emerge. Combined with strategy, a good culture can lead to greater employee and customer retention, higher productivity, and ultimately a strong competitive advantage. 

People Act in Their Own Self Interest - This should be common sense, but the fact that it isn't makes this an important point to remember. People don't do things at work out of the goodness of their hearts or because they're forced to. They perform according to their internal motivators, which can vary by individual. Brightline wisely points out that even if people perceive that something is in the greater collective interest, if it impacts them negatively, they're less likely to be on board and may even actively resist. Communicating the "why" is key, but so is learning their internal needs and motivating factors and trying to address them. I once heard someone say, "The trick is getting people to do what you want them to do because THEY want to do it."

Understanding what people want and what drives them to perform is tricky. Recently, I read a report that Google spent two years studying 180 teams to see what drives high performance. The most successful teams shared the following traits:

  • Dependability (team members could be trusted to get the work done on time and correctly)

  • Structure and Clarity (they had clear goals and well-defined roles)

  • Meaning (the work had personal significance to each team member)

  • Impact (they believed their work was making a difference)

  • Psychological Safety (they weren't afraid to ask questions or challenge the status quo)

This supports and augments the points made by Brightline quite well. Collectively, they serve as a good blueprint for getting the most out of your organization's most valuable asset--its people. If that isn't good resource planning, I don't know what is.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Why Simplification Leads to Greater Adoption

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Before the days of cell phones with great cameras, I went camera shopping in a specialty camera store. I was torn between a fancy Digital SLR camera that was powerful, but too large to always carry around, and a smaller, more portable automatic with good ratings. The manager said to me, "I always tell people that the best camera to own is the one you're going to use."

That lesson always stuck with me, and not just with cameras. It's especially applicable to software and process adoption. It's always best to start simple, and add ingredients as needed.

If the software configuration and/or your processes are as lean as can be, with only the functions that are absolutely necessary, they'll be much more likely to be readily adopted. Most resistance I see is either due to the "why" not being articulated, management not using the data to drive decisions, or overly complex processes and tools. 

Conquering complexity isn’t as difficult as it sounds.

  • Processes can be simplified by using basic checklists where appropriate, and avoiding redundant or unnecessary steps.

  • Tools can be simplified by first determining the output that’s critical for decision making and then configuring the input accordingly.

  • Focus on the goals and the problem being solved instead of all the magnificent possibilities you can think of.

  • Resist the urge to capture additional data "just in case."

  • Reports, too, should be simple and focused on key metrics. Read Edward Tufte’s The Visual Display of Quantitative Information to learn how to simplify reports and communication.

  • Communication can be simplified by making sure each message includes only one main point, augmented by up to three supporting points. 

I often refer to a brilliant statement from artist Hans Hoffman: "Simplicity is the art of removing the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak." This is true whether designing forms; communicating new policies or announcements; creating processes; or configuring software.  By opting for a lean configuration, engaging people in the creation of standards (you don't need to standardize everything), and focusing on only that which is necessary, you can "grease the wheels" for greater success. 

It's as simple as that.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

How Resource Planning Complements Agile

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Some people wonder if and how resource planning applies in an Agile world. There should be no question. The chassis may change from traditional to iterative, but the drivetrain always remains resource planning. In essence, the question is, regardless of delivery approach: How do we make sure we have the capacity to deliver on our strategies at the right time? 

In fact, resource planning not only applies to Agile; it turbo-charges it.

Aakash Gupta puts it succinctly in his article on Project-Management.com titled "Resource Capacity Planning for Agile Teams":

Given how agile is built as a meticulous process driven by a stringent workflow, planning capacity becomes integral to agile’s success... Agile projects make room for innovation, velocity and unparalleled levels of productivity. Tie it in with resource management and you will find yourself with a dream team!"

Indeed, Agile brings a lean, adaptive mindset and a continuous flow of value. Planning adds alignment with strategy, funding, and resources. These are not mutually exclusive concepts and, in fact, complement one another.

There's an old Arabian story about two men on a long trek across the dessert. They wake up one morning and one asks in a panic, "Where are the camels!?" The other man says, "You told me to trust in Allah so I didn't tie them up." The first man replies, "Let me correct my advice. Trust in Allah, but tether your camels!" There've been many variations of this advice since, but the same concept applies to Agile and planning. Allow the empowerment and freedom that Agile brings, but also plan in order to ensure alignment and feasibility.

Back to Gupta's article, which is well worth reading. In it, he introduces the concept of the "focus factor." In other words, when assigning people to teams, it's important to understand how much they are, in fact, available to focus on the actual Agile activity. It's rare when a person can focus 100% on any given activity. There are disruptions, administration, company meetings, emergencies, and so on, and that's not including planned downtime like vacations. The focus factor accounts for this by offsetting their allocation to the team by the desired FTE amount (e.g., Jim can focus 70 percent of his time to the team).

As an aside, PDWare addresses this in their software by allowing people to be allocated to teams by percentage, and then assigning teams to projects. Both numbers are considered in the individual's allocation forecast, along with any other work activities they're assigned to. This allows the automatic creation of a combined resource forecast across Agile and non-Agile work.

Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), created by Dean Leffingwell, bridges planning and Agile on an enterprise scale, aligning portfolio, program, and team activities, and is rapidly gaining popularity. A quote cited on the Scaled Agile website puts it perfectly:

"The more alignment you have, the more autonomy you can grant. The one enables the other."

 —Stephen Bungay, Author and Strategy Consultant


Stay tuned for a future post where I'll talk more about resource planning as it relates to SAFe.

If you’re new to Agile, or even if you're experienced but are finding it difficult to make it work in your organization, I'll be presenting a free webinar Wednesday, March 27 at 11am EST titled "Agile 101 for Resource Managers." It'll offer a complete overview of the basics of Agile, as well as an explanation of how resource planning can boost Agile performance. Click here to register.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The Advantages of Product-Based Execution

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With all the well-publicized challenges inherent with project-based work, could there be greater benefit to operating in "product mode" by organizing ongoing business capability-focused teams around products and product lines? This is the subject of a fascinating article on MartinFowler.com by author and consultant Sriram Narayam (Agile IT Org Design) titled Products Over Projects.

For quite some time I've been suggesting to clients to consider organizing by product, so I'm delighted to see the concept so well articulated and thought out.

Problems with Managing by Project

As Narayam points out, with projects, an initiative is funded, a team is formed, and the outcome is delivered. Then a new project is assigned, and in all probability a new mix of players that have to go through the whole "forming/storming/norming/performing/adjourning" cycle all over again. And forget about ideation, that's a whole separate process done by "other folks." Prioritization also generally happens external to the project. Lastly, the rest of the product lifecycle, including benefits realization, is disconnected.

With a narrow focus on the scope of the project, you run the risk of getting exactly what you asked for (if you’re lucky) but not what you need.

What is Product-Mode and What Kind of Environments is it Applicable To?

In an organization that operates in "product mode," the flow from ideation to build to run is much more holistic. A team is funded based on the needs of the product category, product line, or strategy that they're meant to foster and nurture. The team generates ideas and prioritizes work. The team leads the delivery. The team owns the benefits realization, and is measured by meaningful KPIs, not just whether they delivered to a set of requirements. 

Equally important, the team sticks together beyond the lifecycle of a single project or initiative. They build knowledge and gain rapport, remaining at peak performance throughout. While the article focuses on this approach in the IT sector and the digital realm (beyond just software development), I would add that this concept is broadly applicable and increasingly employed in R&D, Professional Services, NPD organizations, and more. 

Why not create programs around your product categories, products, or product lines and have the teams responsible for the prioritization, development, and nurturing of their area? It's a much more integrated approach.

Narayam uses a case study about the development of a Retirement Calculator as an example. A financial services company needed the calculator in order to steer prospects toward buying retirement products or improving their plan contributions. A project team was assigned to develop the calculator and then… well, that was it for their role. A product-based team would have instead been focused on solving the problem of increasing sales and plan contributions, of which a calculator may have been part of. 

Impact on Resource Planning

Most articles that talk about agile and product-based approaches ignore the ever crucial resource planning aspect. Fortunately, this article doesn't, and specifically cites the staffing utilization challenges, which differ somewhat from that of project-based environments.

For instance, team sizes need to be periodically reviewed to adapt to changing business needs. Areas with light roadmaps may need to be combined with others.  As for prioritization, a central component of resource planning, cross-team "initiative" priorities must still be set centrally, with team-specific "roadmap" priorities managed by the team.

From a cross-team utilization perspective, the article notes that some team members may take on multiple roles if they have bandwidth. However, Narayam wisely cautions against optimizing solely for utilization, implying that optimizing for speed of delivery and value is more beneficial in the long run. He also offers suggestions for employing different types of teams, and even having hybrid core/flex teams, augmenting core teams where appropriate with additional resources.

All in all, Narayam makes sound points in illustrating a refreshing approach to work that is built to foster an increased value focus, reduced time to market, and greater benefits realization. I think the article is an absolute must-read for anyone pursuing greater business agility and value-focused work methods.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Takeaways from the Resource Planning Summit

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I had the good fortune to present with some excellent fellow speakers at this year’s Resource Planning Summit in Nashville, TN.

Speakers were on hand from leading organizations to talk about good practices in resource planning that have helped them succeed, as well as challenges to look out for.

Several common themes emerged across the diverse presenters:

  • Prioritization is essential to good resource planning

  • Engagement across business units is key to allocating resources properly across the enterprise portfolio

  • An ongoing cadence of portfolio reviews and resource allocation is necessary to keep things on track

  • Paying attention to demand distribution and how people and money should be aligned across demand types can help ensure optimal resource utilization

  • The human side of resource management cannot be underestimated. Resource optimization and productivity is as much a psychological issue as it is an alignment and capacity/demand issue.


The closing day keynote speaker was filmmaker/screenwriter David Hayter (X-Men, X-Men 2, Watchmen), whose behind-the-scenes filmmaking stories brought a wealth of advice in an entertaining and humorous fashion. Some key takeaways I noted, especially regarding the soft skills of leadership and resource productivity, but also in project and portfolio management, were:

  • All environments are chaotic to a degree. Some are exceedingly chaotic and downright negative. Sometimes this is because the leader WANTS chaos. They think that constantly changing directions will keep people sharp or give them an advantage (note: It may, but at what cost?). Then it becomes a matter of how to perform well in such environments. This is true in filmmaking and in business.

    • Being unpredictable is one of the power principles espoused in the book, 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene, a Machiavellian tome described by its own publisher as "amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive." Hayter added that this is by no means a recommended strategy, merely an expose into the mind of such leaders.

  • People set the culture of any organization. BUT… the leader's energy (positive or negative) often spreads to the whole team.

  • Regarding projects and programs: Don't be afraid to switch gears if it'll bring greater value, regardless of how much has already been spent. In the X-Men movie, a late decision was made to involve a lead character more because it was the right thing to do, even though it added cost. The value return was exponential.

    • In general, think more toward value than cost. Some of the best ideas weren't planned from the beginning. Sometimes you may need to make a case for taking corrective or new action.   

  • Ernest Hemingway said "Kill your darlings." This is applicable to project portfolios as well. Sometimes to bring greater value, there's more to be eliminated than there is to be added.

  • When given conflicting or contradicting direction by different stakeholders or leaders, have a dialogue to address the differences. Be a leader. 

  • Chaos happens, but a good, open culture can help expedite problem solving. You may reach the same finish line in both positive and negative environments, but the latter is unnecessarily stressful.

  • Since chaos and troubleshooting are the norm, the only thing you can control is yourself and your reaction to it. Some guidelines are:

    • Don't take on a fight you know you can't win

    • A combination of humility, listening, and adapting, plus knowing when to stand up and fight back is the ideal course to take.

    • Patrick Swayze in Roadhouse said, "Be nice... until it's time to not be nice." But keep in mind the above. There is a nobility in the Zen response.

  • Leverage opportunities when you get them, but be prepared to deal with a variety of situations. Remember, "Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity" - Roman philosopher Seneca.


In addition to the above takeaways from David Hayter, attendees were asked to contribute their favorite quotes from the event. Below is a short summary:

  • You can't change an event, but you can change the outcome.

  • Normal is the exception to the rule.

  • People are the fuel on which an organization runs.

  • Life is change.

  • Resource management is the cure for disengagement.

  • Life isn't always the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance.

  • If you want to create a movement, get people engaged.

  • The first casualty in any battle is the plan.

  • Employee entrepreneurial orientation delivers innovation.

  • General Custer could've used resource management.

  • Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

All in all, the event was a splendid time for all (to paraphrase the Beatles).


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Top Considerations for Project Prioritization

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The Forbes Technology Council has a nice little article, Project Prioritization 101, that highlights ten key elements of any good prioritization model. Here are the first five (I've paraphrased):

  1. Align with business strategy - Be sure your projects align with business goals and strategies

  2. Rank projects based on impact and effort (aim to do the impactful ones, discard the rest)

  3. Anticipate setbacks and assess potential losses (it helps if you assess resource needs and have a contingency plan in advance)

  4. Attack time-sensitive and highest impact projects first

  5. Understand your team's bandwidth

On that last topic, which is near and dear to my heart, the article quotes Zohar Dayan, CEO of Wibbitz, who says:

"When it comes to prioritization, the biggest consideration is to measure the impact of a project versus the time and resources that need to be devoted to it. A firm understanding of the value each project brings back to your company coupled with a knowledge of your team’s bandwidth is crucial for prioritization."

I couldn't have said it better. To this , I’d add that Success = Prioritization + Resource Allocation + Execution.

Back to prioritization, I’ve also seen organizations adopt the Eisenhower Matrix (later popularized by Stephen Covey), where projects are categorized based on urgency and importance. Obviously, things that are urgent and important should get done first. Projects that are important, but not urgent, should be scheduled accordingly.

The tricky ones are those that are deemed urgent, but not important. This either means someone has exaggerated the urgency or was unable to articulate its importance. So it’s a matter of determining which it is. And of course, the last category are those that are non-urgent and unimportant, which should be quickly rejected.

Some industries have a rigorous project acceptance process whereby all approved projects are by default highly important and thus use a FIFO (First in, First Out) approach to ranking. Though, with increasingly common resource constraints, this is a weak method in and of itself., and would benefit from a relative impact/effort assessment.

Check out the Forbes article for additional prioritization info, and the remaining five tips.

Also, for information on lean prioritization methods, see this insightful article from All About Lean, titled, “How to Manage Your Lean Projects - Prioritize.”

Finally, to complete the trifecta of valuable prioritization articles, see this HBR article, “How to Prioritize Your Company’s Projects,” which talks about how having a “Hierarchy of Purpose” is critical to any prioritization model. This involves tying together the 5 Ps (Purpose, Priorities, Projects, People, and Performance).

Happy reading!


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Can You Really Deliver That Strategy? What You Need to Ask

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Strategy execution is more than just agreeing on your strategies and doing them. There are multiple facets that enable successful organizations to deliver on their strategy, not the least of which is resource planning.

A recent Brightline article, "Uncertainties and Risks of Strategy Implementation" by DTU (Technical University of Denmark), originally published at The London School of Economics and Political Science on October 11, 2018, proposes four aspects of successful strategy implementation that must be considered:

  • Technical Feasibility - Can it be done?

  • External Factors - How is the world affecting our strategy?

  • Execution - Can we do it?

  • Objectives/Market Needs - Do we have the right objectives?

This is an excellent model that puts all the right elements in perspective. Often forgotten under Execution (Can we do it?) is the act of resource planning. After all, if you don't align the right people with your priority initiatives, you're throwing marbles in your own path.

Meanwhile, on LinkedIN Pulse, Vishal Lall, Chief Strategy Officer for Hewlett Packard Enterprise, authored another insightful article titled "Three Reasons Your Strategies Don't Execute -- and How to Fix Them" that echoes this approach, specifically emphasizing the resource alignment issue. In particular, Lall proposes three key questions that organizations must ask:

  1. Was the strategy designed correctly?

  2. Were the teams aligned around the objectives?

  3. Were the right enablers in place?

Supporting this model, Lall cites six areas that can help improve the link between strategy to execution, again citing "Be brutal with resource allocation" as one of them.

I'm glad to see this finally being recognized as a key component of strategy execution. I highly recommend both articles (links above).

PS: Not long ago, I posted another article highlighting Brightline’s 10 guiding principles for strategy execution, where resource planning and prioritization were key elements. Check it out HERE.


Related to the topic of resource planning and strategy execution, PDWare was recently recognized in Gartner’s 2018 Market Guide for Strategy Execution Management Software. See the PRESS RELEASE for details on how an increased need for speed and agility is driving growing interest in strategy execution software.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Resource Planning Can Make You a Superhero: The Human Side of Resource Planning

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People often associate resource planning with cold numbers or hard skills, and speak in terms of "FTEs," "resources," and "head count." For a high performing, motivated team, it's crucial to remember that it's human beings we're dealing with. Unlike machine parts, human beings have good days and bad days and family issues and working styles, and all sorts of things that can impact their work, for better or worse. As one of the key founding fathers of Agile, Alistair Cockburn, once shared with me, "People are not suitcases, to be moved around at will." 

Indeed, optimizing resources means creating an environment where people can do their best work. A pioneer in the positive psychology movement, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, created the concept of Flow, where people are so immersed in what they're doing that time seems to stand still. To enable that optimal state, they must be doing work that both has an appropriate level of challenge and is an appropriate match for their skills/strengths. Too little challenge creates apathy. A skills mismatch creates frustration. Either will reduce interest and productivity.

Of course, for Flow to happen in the first place, the environment must be suitable for it. 

A big part of enabling people to do their best means not overloading them with multitasking or forcing them to work out of their comfort zones. This is best addressed through resource planning (for lack of a more suitable term), which involves ensuring that incoming pipeline projects are prioritized and the availability of people with suitable skills is assessed. There are multiple approaches for addressing any shortfall, including delaying or altering the incoming work, securing outside or additional resources, or shifting priorities.

Management guru Ken Blanchard said, "Profit is the applause you get for creating a motivating environment for your people and taking care of your customers." With this in mind, you can become an absolute superhero to your organization, and the people in it, by introducing and/or improving a resource planning process that will enable optimal performance.

Speaking of superheroes, I was especially saddened to hear of the recent passing of Marvel legend Stan Lee. I grew up reading his stories and had the good fortune to meet him at a comic con a few years back, where I happened to be speaking on the art of storytelling (side note: I write sci-fi in my other life). He was a gracious man with a knack for telling captivating tales. A consistent theme he'd always preached through his characters was that doing the right thing was heroic, and that superheroes can come in all shapes and sizes.  

It does not seem a stretch to extrapolate from that a valuable lesson that introducing resource planning is simply the right thing to do. It's right for the people, right for creating value, and right for the top and bottom line. The other choice is to continue business as usual, burning people out while projects get delayed, errors increase, and customers get irate. The question then, is: Can you afford NOT to do resource planning? 

I know which option Stan Lee and Ken Blanchard would choose.


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PS: Related to the topic of superheroes and resource planning, noted screenwriter and filmmaker David Hayter (X-Men, Watchmen, and more) will be delivering a keynote at the 2019 Resource Planning Summit in Nashville, TN (Feb 10-13). He'll be sharing team-building and resource planning lessons from the fictional world of superheroes as well as real-life superheroes, the teams that make the films, amid high complexity, constant change, and tight deadlines. To learn more, visit www.ResourcePlanningSummit.com


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Gain an Edge at the Resource Planning Summit: New Speakers Announced

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Resource management is simple, right? All you have to do is not schedule more work than you have people for, and make sure you have the right skills available for the right work at the right time. 

For many, that's easier said than done. The truth is, amid constant dynamic change, digital transformation, rapid innovation, and business complexity, you need a resource planning model that's lean and adaptive, meant to support greater agility and change. You need systems to provide visibility and accommodate multiple work methods. And you need to optimize the resources you do have for high performance.

Fortunately, others have paved the way with tools, tips, and techniques.

This is why PDWare sponsors the Resource Planning Summit each year, to hear and share the latest thought leadership on resource management, to share challenges and ideas, and to gain the insights of the collective experts in attendance. As they say, a rising tide raises all ships.

The upcoming Resource Planning Summit in Nashville, TN on Feb 10-13 is shaping up to be bigger than ever, with a growing lineup of speakers, including leading experts, authors, and practitioners in the world of resource and portfolio management. 

Speakers will be talking about organizational agility and resource planning; optimizing performance in mission-critical environments; why Agile resource management is so unique; and more. You'll hear from PMO directors, consultants, authors, as well as valuable insights from those who've overcome common resource management challenges. Plus, there's a panel on combining Agile and Waterfall resources.

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In addition to thought leaders and practitioners, filmmaker/screenwriter David Hayter (X-Men, Watchmen, and more) will share team-building lessons from the fictional world of superheroes as well as real-life superheroes-(aka the teams that make the films, amid high complexity, constant change, and tight deadlines). And, of course, this being Nashville, noted songwriter and humorist Patrick Henry will be on hand to show how to keep your resource management team in tune—literally.  

Recently, I had the pleasure to interview another RPS speaker, Donna Fitzgerald, executive director of Nimble PM and former Gartner VP, on why resource management, product focus, and spontaneous projects are the driving force behind adaptive strategy execution, especially in these volatile days of digital transformation. Check it out HERE.

And here's a short video preview of the upcoming event in Nashville. 

Hope to see you all at the summit!

PS: I'll be looking forward to speaking at the event as well, sharing timeless resource planning lessons from a thousand years of military history. After all, you don't want to be like General Custer!


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

When is Agile Not Agile? Common Mistakes to Avoid

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As organizations strive to gain greater business agility, many are adopting Agile methodologies, not realizing that their implementation of it is anything but agile. In fact, it's often quite the opposite, turning the original set of guiding Agile principles on its head.

Bestselling authors Lindsay McGregor and Neel Doshi wrote an insightful article in HBR titled "Why Agile Goes Awry---And How To Fix It" that makes this very claim.

"In the spirit of becoming more adaptive," they say, "organizations have rushed to implement Agile software development. But many have done so in a way that actually makes them less agile." Not only that, it makes them less motivating.

The article goes on to contrast the original four guiding principles of Agile with the common practices that seem in direct opposition.

Regarding the principle of "Individuals and interactions over processes and tools," many organizations have let their Agile process become so rigid that people feel handcuffed by it and aren't allowed to question it. According to the article, developers and engineers have reporting feeling like “short order cooks.” Not surprisingly, I’ve heard this very term used myself in some Agile organizations.

And despite the mantra of "Working software over comprehensive documentation," some teams spend significant time documenting detailed user stories to the detriment of the true Agile mission of getting small experiments done in a collaborative manner.

Speaking of collaboration, the core Agile philosophy of "Customer collaboration over contract negotiation" goes out the window when the process involves work being passed like a baton from product managers to designers to engineers, with the customer nowhere in sight until release time.

Lastly, the principle of "Responding to change over following a plan" has become confused with "winging it" or "picking features that look interesting" as opposed to high value, strategically-important features that have been prioritized with the customer.

None of this is theoretical speculation. On the contrary, it’s sadly become common practice in many companies. Indeed, the authors based their findings on their study of engineering practices in 500 organizations, along with anecdotal evidence. 

The most striking finding of all was that these practices not only ignore core Agile principles, but they bring about the opposite result that Agile was intended to deliver. They demotivate people. As the authors put it, "Because they’re not allowed to experiment, manage their own work, and connect with customers, they feel little sense of play, potential, and purpose." 

It’s a sad, all-too-predictable, Dilbert-like situation. But all is not lost. The authors propose six changes to consider to better balance tactical and adaptive performance:

1. Software development should be a no-handoff, collaborative process.

2. The team’s unit of delivery should be minimally viable experiments. 

3. The team’s approach should be customer-centric.

4. Use timeboxes to focus experimentation and avoid waste.

5. The team should be organized to emphasize collaboration.

6. The team should constantly question their process.

For projects that benefit from an Agile approach (and not every project does), I couldn’t agree more. The authors expand on each in the article, so it's well worth a read.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

When It Comes to Resource Planning, Timing is Everything

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Brightline (a PMI-led coalition of leading global organizations dedicated to helping executives bridge the gaps between strategy and execution) released an excellent infographic, developed by the Technical Institute of Denmark, called "Timing is Money." 

The infographic looks at four dilemmas that represent the four dynamic tensions that relate to timing when implementing strategy, particularly:

  • The Horizon Dilemma (near horizon vs. distant future)

  • The Urgency Dilemma (implementing quickly vs. moving too fast for your organization)

  • The Process Dilemma (tightly defined strategy vs. business agility)

  • The Rhythm Dilemma (natural work rhythms vs. getting everyone in sync when needed) 

Having written a book on common leadership dilemmas (Managing the Gray Areas), this approach is near and dear to my heart. Not surprisingly, for each dilemma, the infographic offers practical solutions that balance both sides of the equation.

I was particularly pleased that, for the Rhythm Dilemma, the recommended solution was to "dedicate and mobilize the right resources" and embrace new leadership rhythms that allow for syncing the disparate rhythms across the organization. 

This, of course, requires effective resource planning, which itself ties back to the other three dilemmas. For instance, the Horizon Dilemma applies, because you need to strike a balance between short term named resource planning and longer term skills planning. 

Regarding the Urgency Dilemma, having a clear picture of demand vs. capacity will let you know if you're taxing the organization beyond its ability to immediately take on something new. It also gives you the data to make informed tradeoff decisions.

Lastly, the Process Dilemma, which aims to balance strategy and agility, requires that resource forecasts show all types of work (Agile and otherwise) and depict how effort is being consumed across the overall prioritized backlog of the organization. This, in effect, helps tie effort utilization back to strategy, while also allowing for the change that business agility necessitates. 

Check out the infographic. Not only does it serve as a compass for bridging strategy and execution, it also serves as an excellent foundation for resource planning.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The One Thing You Need to Do To Resolve Project Overload

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Too many projects and not enough people. It’s a battle cry heard in organizations everywhere. A new article published in HBR (Harvard Business Review) titled “Too Many Projects: Why Companies Won’t Let Bad Projects Die” tackles the issue head on. Authors Rose Hollister and Michael D. Watkins offer key insights into the root of the problem, along with some practical, spot-on solutions.

The gist of the solution can be summed up in two words: Resource Management,

This includes:

  • the demand/capacity visibility and transparency that prioritization and resource planning brings

  • continuously considering the triple constraint of demand, supply, and priority with every new project request, ongoing resource assignment, and project execution checkpoint. 

Hollister and Watkins offer a few cautions as well.

They warn against prioritizing by function or department alone, lest silo thinking will sabotage enterprise prioritization efforts.

Likewise, they advise against simply instituting an overall prioritization process without deciding what to cut (i.e., planning without execution). 

They also suggest avoiding uniform percentage cuts for each department because then organizational priorities aren't considered.

The authors include four areas to assess before each new initiative is undertaken, all of which relate directly to resource management (which I propose includes balancing demand with capacity).

The four areas are (the parts in parenthesis are my added description):

  • Analyzing the project (for goals and expected benefits)

  • Assessing the resources (and the resource and cost impact on the organization vs. other work)

  • Sizing up stakeholder support (for commitment and to validate priorities)

  • Setting limits (and identifying tradeoffs needed in order to fit the work in)

For more on the causes and cures for project overload, I highly suggest reading their article.


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Note: Whether you’re new to resource planning concepts or an experienced veteran, you may find value in the 8th Annual Resource Planning Summit, February 10-13, 2019 in Nashville, TN. Registration is now open. I’ll be speaking at the event, along with PMI Fellow Frank Saladis and a number of other leaders in the field. The full speaker lineup will be announced shortly. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Strategic Planning in an Agile World

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I've often written about the importance of continuous planning at multiple levels, while also emphasizing the urgency of fostering business agility to meet dynamically changing needs.

I came across an HBR article by Alessandro Di Fiore, founder and CEO of the European Centre for Strategic Innovation (ECSI), titled "Planning Doesn't Have to Be the Enemy of Agile" that, to me, captures the essence of the tension between strategic planning and team-based agility. More importantly, it offers examples of how to make the two seemingly opposite concepts work well together.

As Di Fiore says, "The logic of centralized long-term strategic planning (done once a year at a fixed time) is the antithesis of an organization redesigned around teams who define their own priorities and resources allocation on a weekly basis."

To resolve this tension, he proposes that a new form of "Agile Planning" is needed that aligns top down strategic planning, bottom-up team-based decision-making, prioritization, and execution, and a mid-level process that helps bridge the two.

In effect, this blends the best of both worlds -- where agile teams leverage qualitative data and judgement to aid in prioritization and resource allocation, while big data continues to flow in through the strategic planning process and Information Technology. The sweet spot is the right combination of human judgement and hard data.

Put another way, I think it's safe to say that team judgment without data is blind, and relying on data alone is deaf. The corporate graveyards are full of companies that have done either or both.

When Corporate Strategy Meets Team Execution

The idea of blending top-down and bottom-up planning is consistent with other successful examples I've seen. The great author and cultural expert, Fons Trompenaars (Did the Pedestrian Die, 21 Leaders for the 21st Century, and others), once shared how Heineken learned this lesson the hard way.

As Trompenaars explains, Heineken released a TV ad where a woman was frantically rooting through her closet trying to find something to wear for a date. Then the doorbell rings. It's her date, who throws her a leather jacket. The next scene shows them in a bar drinking Heineken with the slogan: "Beer as beer is meant to be."

Well, in some countries, sales went down, not up. Upon research, Heineken learned why. Apparently, in those particular cultures, the message received was: "Only slobs drink Heineken."

Oops!

After than, Heineken changed their approach. The provided a top-down theme and general priorities (e.g., In the European region, portray Heineken as a casual, relaxing beer) and left it up to the local advertising departments within that region to come up with an ad that would work in their country. It worked like a charm.

They chose another theme for the Caribbean region (Portray Heineken as a metropolitan beer), with each island creating their own ads. Again, it work so well, that Heineken began winning all sorts of advertising awards. To this day, they continue to win advertising awards, with what I might call a hub-and-spoke planning model. 

It's a similar concept to Agile Planning: Remain agile in terms of priorities, methods, and execution while providing corporate themes and strategies from the top. What Di Fiore details is the bridge between corporate planning and individual teams. I highly recommend reading his article.

Bottom line: When it comes to strategy execution, resource planning, and business agility, you CAN have your cake and eat it too.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Registration Now Open for the Resource Planning Summit 2019!

We’re happy to announce that Registration is now open for the 8th Annual Resource Planning Summit, February 11-13 at the beautiful Hutton Hotel in Nashville, TN.

The Resource Planning Summit is the premier event for promoting best practices in Resource Management, Demand Management, Capacity Planning, and how all these disciplines apply to Projects, Sprints, and Strategy Execution.

The two and a half day conference is a meeting of the minds to learn, share and network with like-minded professionals on how to best utilize and optimize enterprise resource planning techniques and software across various industries and businesses.

  • Interact with managers, executives, PMOs, EPPMOs, PPM industry experts and companies

  • Participate in interactive sessions, and panel discussions

  • Learn from industry leaders, top notch speakers and keynotes 

  • Earn PDUs over 2+ Content Filled Days

  • Experience Nashville, TN with a purpose

Be sure to register early, as this year's venue is in high demand. We look forward to seeing you in Nashville!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Sponsorships Still Available

Sponsorships are still available. Sponsorship includes an optional vendor booth at the conference, promotion in conference materials and marketing, special mention at the conference, and more. For info, please call Judy: (203) 894 5666; or email us at info@resourceplanningsummit.com.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

7 Practices of Resource-Savvy Organizations

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Maximizing your organization's human capacity to get things done doesn't have to be complicated. It fact, it's pretty much common sense.

Note that I'm NOT talking about increasing capacity. That's easy. Just hire more people or pay for contractors. I'm talking about maximizing the resources you already have.

To start, there are two fundamental principles at play for maximizing your resources:

  1. Increase value focus

  2. Increase performance

In other words, if your resources are working on the right stuff at peak performance, you're operating at optimal capacity. It's as simple as that.

Now the trick is how to achieve that.

For guidance, it pays to look at high-performing, resource-savvy organizations. From studies I've been involved with, I've found that such organizations tend to observe seven distinct practices that increase both value-focus and performance. 

Specifically, they:

  1. Prioritize all work - All work should be categorized and prioritized in the context of overall value to the organization. Otherwise, precious time could be spent on lower value activities. Also note that priority is methodology agnostic. 

  2. Eliminate waste -This includes excess approvals when checklists would suffice; redundant process steps; extraneous data on forms; excessive documentation that nobody will read; capturing data that nobody is using; and more.

  3. Clarify goals - If people aren't clear on the organization's goals and priorities, then their interests may not be aligned with value. Always reinforce goals as opposed to "tasks." Better yet, engage them in strategizing on how to achieve the goals.

  4. Align people with their strengths - People perform best when they're able to leverage their primary strengths toward an interesting challenge. A strength mismatch will create frustration, while a lack of challenge will create apathy. This is the concept behind the Flow principle.

  5. Reduce multitasking - It's been proven that multitasking decreases productivity. Encourage people to schedule "downtime" to focus, and avoid diluting productivity with multiple concurrent initiatives.

  6. Enable with tools and training - Even the most talented, motivated people will struggle without the proper tools and training to do their job effectively. Skimping here is like burdening your people with a heavy backpack and expecting them to run at peak performance. 

  7. Institute continuous resource planning - Resource planning looks at work in the context of three variables: supply, demand, and priority. The goal is to meet demand with supply in priority order, so that if any work gets bumped, it'll be the lower priority activities. Regular, ongoing resource planning ensures that people are always aligned with value, and that they aren't overloaded beyond their capacity. 

Collectively, these practices can drive value-focused performance, while also fostering a positive, inspiring culture. Resource-savvy organizations that have adopted them have seen a boost in productivity, employee retention, and customer satisfaction. Best of all, they've gone from reactive to proactive.

I’d venture to say they've also taken to heart the wise words of Albert Einstein:

Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

When Execution Problems Foil Good Resource Plans

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In the campy, fun, 1966 Batman film, Batman (played by Adam West) was running all over a waterfront marketplace trying to dispose of an active bomb (the round, black kind, like in the Bugs Bunny cartoons). To his dismay, everywhere he wanted to dump the bomb, people kept showing up, from marching bands to conversing nuns to mothers with baby carriages. Even a family of ducks got in the way, swimming by just as he was about to finally toss the bomb in the water. Frustrated, he looked at the camera and uttered the now iconic line:

"Some days, you just can't get rid of a bomb."

When it comes to the workplace, sometimes, things happen that are indeed out of anyone's control, despite the best of plans. Other times, people simply don't perform, for various reasons. You've planned to get the right people on the right projects and the right time, but they simply aren't executing.

The good news is that this latter situation is fixable. 

In his book, Fixing Performance Problems, executive coach Bud Bilanich suggests that there are 11 reasons why employees don’t do what they’re supposed to, and most of the reasons are not the fault of the employee (the list was influenced by the writings of training and education guru Robert Mager). Bilanich, also known as “The Common Sense Guy,” proposes that we rule out all 11 reasons and their solutions in sequence. They are as follows (the comments in parenthesis are my own):

1.     People don’t know what they’re supposed to do.

2.    People don’t know why they should do what they are supposed to do.

3.    People don’t know how to do what they’re supposed to do.

4.    People think the prescribed methods will not, or do not work, or believe that their way is better. (Hint: They may be right! Only through open dialogue will you know. For more on this, see my earlier post, Strategy Execution is Driven by Conversations)

5.    People think other things are more important. (Again, they may be right! And again, this is where open and candid communication comes in, which requires a culture of trust and respect.)

6.    People think they are performing in an acceptable manner. (Maybe they are! Or Maybe expectations weren't clear.)

7.    Non-performance is rewarded. (by giving them less work. Instead, focus on figuring out the cause and helping them be a valuable contributor.) 

8.   Good performance feels like punishment. (by piling even more work on them!)

9.   There are obstacles to performing that the individual cannot control. (i.e., the Batman situation)

10.  There are no positive consequences for good performance.

11.  There are no negative consequences for poor performance.

Note that negative consequences aren’t addressed until point 11. That’s because flawed systems, mismanagement, and poor communication are frequently the root cause of the supposed inferior performance. Indeed, before assuming poor performance is the fault of the employee, we owe it to the employee---and to ourselves as leaders---to rule out the first 10 points.

Speaking of negative consequences, Bilanich reminds us that a simple reminder may be adequate.

He tells the story of the final moments of the 1968 NBA Eastern Division basketball playoffs, where the Boston Celtics were facing the Philadelphia 76ers. Bill Russell missed a crucial foul shot, and his teammate Sam Jones called him aside and whispered some words in his ear. Russell nodded, then made the next foul shot to win the game.

The big news story that followed was, “What were the magic words that Sam Jones uttered to Bill Russell?” For a while, the players were silent on the topic. Eventually, it came out. The magic words were:

Flex your knees, Bill.

Often, that’s all it takes.


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Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Is Your Organization Value-Focused?

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Professor and author Morten Hansen wrote an excellent article on the American Management Association Playbook site titled "One Big Mistake Managers Must Avoid (It's About Your Time)". 

In the article, he shares a key finding from his study of more than 5,000 managers and employees: namely that they tend to focus more on internal goals and metrics than on the value being delivered.

To remedy this, he suggests first identifying what's valuable, then assessing your calendar and reducing non-value items, and finally, reallocating your time, shifting from goals to value activities.

While the article is directed at helping managers and their employees shift to higher value activities, I'd add that the same principles should be applied at a macro level organizationally. 

To start with, it's important to define a strategic hierarchy of organizational missions, objectives, strategies, and programs/projects that support those strategies. This can help ensure that program and project work is tied to value from the beginning. 

What about non-project activities? Some organizations consider all work to be "project" work. After all, even operational and sustaining work can be tied to an annual or quarterly bucket project, which itself is tied to the objective of "keeping the lights on". Percentage-based or effort-based resource allocations can be applied to that work.

In essence, the goal is to see the big picture of demand for people's time for the entire spectrum of activities. From there you can get a better sense about whether you're distributing that time wisely at an organizational level.

This is where resource planning and continuous reallocation based on priorities come in, always striving for greatest value (which we know can change over time). The result is greater business agility, less waste, and happier customers.

So, at a macro level, the same three principles outlined in the article apply:

  • Identify what's valuable (by setting a strategic hierarchy and tying programs and projects to it)
  • Aim to reduce non-value work (by assessing your funding and resource allocations by strategy)
  • Shift to high value work -- (by continuously reallocating based on priorities and value)

If this is combined with Hansen's article's recommendations for managers and employees to focus on value, then you can truly say you have a value-focused organization from the top-down and bottom-up.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.

How to Include People AND Make Expedient Decisions

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In his insightful article on PM Times titled The Power of Team Belonging, author George Pitagorsky (The Zen Approach to Project Management) raises the importance of inclusiveness, along with some interesting predicaments. For instance, what if a team is under pressure and in the interest of making expedient decisions, excludes one or more members? 

There's something to be said for avoiding time-consuming debate, but there are always methods for including and considering alternate ideas, and informing people why certain approaches are being taken. It also avoids active sabotage. There are even ways of reframing the "outsiders" as external contributors or advisors, whether or not they're part of the core team. Pitagorsky talks about this in the context of defining formal role definitions for stakeholders.

In my book, Managing the Gray Areas, I talk about seven common leadership dilemmas, one being how to balance the needs of individuals with the needs of the organization. Pitagorsky deftly addresses this issue head on, suggesting ways to make people feel included, even when ruling against their ideas or keeping them external to the core team. 

In essence, an ounce of inclusion is worth a pound of disenchantment. Plus you may get some good, alternate ideas or issues to consider.

Pitagorsy sums it up best:

The trade-offs between the perceived burden of communicating, managing relationships and doing due diligence in decision making, and the benefits of healthy long-term relationships, problem avoidance and optimal product quality should drive the decision makers.
— George Pitagorsky

I highly recommend reading the full article, and considering the impact of belonging whenever making team decisions.


JB Manas - website photo.jpg

Jerry Manas is the bestselling author of The Resource Management and Capacity Planning Handbook, Napoleon on Project Management, and more. At PDWare, Jerry helps clients improve strategy execution through tools and processes that align people and work with organizational priorities. Connect with Jerry on Twitter and LinkedIn.